M. Jackson Group Update – December 2017 – Coffee Consumption and Health

This month’s post is again from Ken Pope’s listserv, where he kindly provides daily summaries of current articles in the field.
It could be argued that it is somewhat self-serving to push articles that support my own lifestyle.  However, it really is striking how positive the data is on the use of coffee.  Also, this article is short, allowing time to get a coffee.
 
The article is as follows (excerpting and editing is by Ken Pope):
 
The British Medical Journal includes an article: “Coffee consumption and health: umbrella review of meta-analyses of multiple health outcomes.”
 
The authors are Robin Poole, specialty registrar in public health1, Oliver J Kennedy, graduate medical student1, Paul Roderick, professor of public health1, Jonathan A Fallowfield, NHS Research Scotland senior clinical fellow2, Peter C Hayes, professor of hepatology2, Julie Parkes, associate professor of public health1.
 
Here’s an excerpt from the Discussion section: ” We carried out this umbrella review to bring this existing evidence together and draw conclusions for the overall effects of coffee consumption on health. We identified 201 meta-analyses of observational research with 67 unique outcomes and 17 meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials with nine unique outcomes.”
 
Another excerpt: “The conclusion of benefit associated with coffee consumption was supported by significant associations with lower risk for the generic outcomes of all cause mortality,28 cardiovascular mortality,28 and total cancer.38 Consumption was associated with a lower risk of specific cancers, including prostate cancer,394490 endometrial cancer,394091 melanoma,4145 non-melanoma skin cancer,42 and liver cancer.43 Consumption also had beneficial associations with metabolic conditions including type 2 diabetes,2165 metabolic syndrome,26 gallstones,25 gout,67 and renal stones66 and for liver conditions including hepatic fibrosis,63 cirrhosis,963 cirrhosis mortality,9 and chronic liver disease combined.43 The beneficial associations between consumption and liver conditions stand out as consistently having the highest magnitude compared with other outcomes across exposure categories. Finally, there seems to be beneficial associations between coffee consumption and Parkinson’s disease,227677 depression,7879 and Alzheimer’s disease.80”
 
The article is online at:
 
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